Comte Henri De Bylandt
1894/1904

Head - Distinctly Terrier-likeskull, falling away behind the eyes in a marked degree, not quite flat., but not domed nor aple-shaped.
Fore-face of fair length, strong in front of the eyes; stop slightly developed.


Lionel Jacob 1901

Head. Distinctly terrier-like. Skull narrow, falling away behind the eyes in a marked degree, not quite fiat, but not domed or apple-shaped. Fore-face of fair length, strong in front of the eyes. The stop size for size about that of a Skye terrier.

Standard 1935

Head - Heavy head furnishings with good faIl over eyes, good whiskers and beard; skull narrow, falling away behind the eyes in a marked degree, not quite flat, but not domed or apple shaped; straighs foreface of fair length. Nose black, about 1 1/2 inches long, of the length from tip of nose to eye to be roughly about 1/3 of the total length from nose to back of skull.


Standard 1960

Head - Heavy head furnishing with good fall over eyes, good whiskers and beard. Skull narrow, falling away behind the eyes in a marked degree; not quite flat, but not domed or apple shaped; straight foreface of fair length. Nose black, about 1 1/2 inches long, or the length from tip of nose to eye to be roughly about one third of the total length from nose to back of skull.


Dr Guy LESCURE 1961

LE TERRIER DE LHASSA" 1961

A – General Look
The head’s volume is medium compared to the body. The length from the external occipital crest to the anterior extreme of the nose, is 10,5 cm average, for a total body length of 31 cm measured from the point of the withers to the point of the buttock. A good equilibrium between the muscles structure and the bones frame gives the dog distinguished look.

The head width at zygomatic brows level is about 7 cm, whereas the total length from the cranio-frontal region, measured on same subjects, from the occipital crest to the line linking the internal angles of the eye-lids, gives an average figure of 6,5 cm. This slight predominance, of the first dimension, according to veterinary doctor HEROUT, allows to classify the Lhasa terrier, from the craniometric point of view, as a brachycephalic,but a limit brachycephalic, getting close to the average mesaticephalic.

The skull longitudinal axis which respective directions are determined by two lines, one given by the upper profile of the muzzle, the other starting at the arch of the eye-brows and ending at occipital crest, are slightly converging, thus giving the Lhasa Terrier a profile of a “sub-concaviligne” in Professor DECHAMBRE’s classification.

B- Detailed study of the head.
Superior face : Cranio-frontal region :
The skull is larger than long, its superior profile is slightly convex.
The cranio-frontal is the longest region of the upper part of the head. For a total head length of 10,5 cm, the cranial region measures 6,5 cm and the facial region 4 cm. According to Veterinary Doctor HERAUT, this clear predominance of the skull portion over the facial portion, in the longitudinal axis, according to a proportion of about 3 to 2, and skull indice slightly inferior to 1, allows, by the only study of the skull, to classify morphologically the Lhasa terrier in the sub-brevilignes. The body proportions will also confirm this classification..

-The frontal furrow slightly marked..
-The stop or frontal septum slightly pronounced.

The angle formed by the cranio-frontal region and the muzzle is of 130°average. The angle of the stop in the “mediolignes” trends towards 145°,on the opposite, in the “ultra-brevilignes” the angle is about 90°; the Lhasa angle front/muzzle (with about 130°) confirms he is indeed a sub-breviligne.


Standard 1972

Head and skull:
Heavy head furnishing with good fall over the eyes, good whiskers and beard . Skull moderately narrow, falling away behind the eyes in a marked degree; not quite flat, but not domed or apple shaped;
Straight foreface, with medium stop the length from tip of nose to be roughly one-third the total length from nose to back of skull.


A.K.C. Standard 1978

Heavy head furnishings with good fall over eyes, good whiskers and beard; skull narrow, falling away behind the eyes in a marked degree. not quite flat, but not
domed or apple-shapped ; straight foreface of fair length. Nose black, the lenght from tip of nose to eye to be roughly about one third of the total length from nose to back of skull.


C.K.C. Standard 1982
(Canada)

The skull is narrow, falling away from behind the eyebrow ridges to a marked degree.  Cranium almost flat, not domed or apple-shaped. Viewed from the front, the top of the cranium is narrower than the width at the level of the eyes. The forface is straight.


A.N.K.C. Standard 1987
(Australie)

Heavy head furnishings with good fall over the eyes, good whiskers and beard.  Skull moderately narrow, falling away behind the eyes in a marked degree; not quite flat, but not domed or apple shaped.  Straight foreface, with medium stop.  Nose black.  Muzzle about 3.8 cm (1 1/2 ins) long, but not square; the length from tip of nose to be roughly one-third the total length from nose to back of skull.


F.C.I. Standard 1987

Heavy head furnishings with good fall over the eyes, good whiskers and beard.  Skull moderately narrow, falling away behind the eyes, not quite flat, but not domed or apple headed.  Straight foreface with medium stop. Nose black. Muzzle about 4 cm (11 /2 “) but not square: length from tip of nose roughly one third total length from nose to back of skull.


F.C.I.. Standard 1998

Head & Skull: Heavy head furnishings with good fall over the eyes, good whiskers and beard. Skull moderately narrow, falling away behind the eyes, not quite flat, but not domed or apple-headed. Straight foreface with medium stop. Nose black. Muzzle about 4 cm (11/2 ins), but not square; length from tip of nose roughly one third total length from nose to back of skull.

Kennel Club 2003

Heavy head furnishings with good fall over eyes, good whiskers and beard. Skull moderately narrow, falling away behind eyes, not quite flat, but not domed or apple headed. Straight foreface with medium stop.

Truffe
Museau = 4 cms
Stop-Occiput = 8 cms

Lhassa Apso is a:
LIMITED BRACHYCEPHALE approching MESATICEPHALE type
SUBCONCAVILIGNE
SUBBREVILIGNE


STOP = Angle crânio-facial


ULTRABREVILIGNES = trends towards 90° (Shi Tzu)
SUB-BREVILIGNES = 130° (Lhassa Apso)
BREVILIGNES
MEDIOLIGNES = 145°
LONGILIGNES = trends towards 180°