Standard 1960

Strong, well covered with a mane which is more pronounced in dogs than bitches.

Dr Guy LESCURE 1961

The neck is short and slightly arched.


Standard 1972

Strong, well covered with a "dense" mane which is more pronounced in dogs than bitches


C.K.C. Standard 1982
(Canada)

Well set on to the shoulders. Long enough to carry the head well creating an impression of elegance. Slightly arched.


A.N.K.C. Standard 1987
(Australie)

Strong, well covered with a dense mane, which should be more pronounced in dogs than in bitches.


F.C.I. Standard 1987

Strong and well arched


Frances Sefton
1987

...judges and novice exhibitors looking for swan necks with the addition of the word “well arched”...


F.C.I.. Standard 1998

Strong and well arched


2003
Kennel Club

Strong and well arched


Comments




The dog, whatever its bred or its size is, has always 7 cervical vertebrae, 13 dorsal vertebrae and 7 lumbar vertebrae.

According to Dr. Lescur the correct scapulo-humeral angulation of the Lhassa is of 115°.


The more open the scapulo-humeral angle will be the more the neck will seem short The more the scapulo-huméral angle will be closed, the more the neck will seem long, (first dorsal vertebrae appearing with the cervical vetebrae).

The "swan neck" is the proof of a bad scapulo-humeral angulation, too closed, which will give to the dog an uncorrect gate .